Spike protein

New Study From Harvard Shows “Systemic” Presence of Spike Proteins in Blood Following Vaccination

A new paper published this week in Oxford scientific journal Clinical Infectious Diseases has shown that the spike protein from an mRNA Covid vaccine is present systemically in the blood from the day of the jab and is not localised to the site of injection. The research team from Harvard found the protein in the blood of 11 of 13 nurses tested following vaccination. Here is the abstract:

SARS-CoV-2 proteins were measured in longitudinal plasma samples collected from 13 participants who received two doses of mRNA-1273 [Moderna] vaccine. 11 of 13 participants showed detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 protein as early as day one after first vaccine injection. Clearance of detectable SARS-CoV-2 protein correlated with production of IgG and IgA.

The Covid vaccines introduce genetic material into the body which give our cells instructions to produce the spike protein, which the immune system then learns to fight off and produces antibodies against. It had not previously been confirmed whether the spike protein was only produced locally to the injection site or could be detected more widely in the body.

The implications of this finding are unclear. As the authors state: “The clinical relevance of this finding is unknown and should be further explored.” However, it would seem to explain why side-effects potentially connected to the spike protein can occur throughout the body and are not localised to the injection site.

Coronavirus Spike Protein Alone May Cause Lung Damage

Research on mice has found that exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by itself, without the rest of the virus or any viral replication, is enough to cause COVID-19-like symptoms, including severe inflammation of the lungs. Dr Pavel Solopov, Research Assistant Professor at Old Dominion University in America, who led the research, told the Medical Xpress:

Our findings show that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein causes lung injury even without the presence of intact virus. This previously unknown mechanism could cause symptoms before substantial viral replication occurs.

The researchers injected genetically modified mice with a segment of the spike protein and compared them after 72 hours with a control group injected with saline. The outcome was unmistakable, according to the Medical Xpress.

The researchers found that the genetically modified mice injected with the spike protein exhibited COVID-19-like symptoms that included severe inflammation, an influx of white blood cells into their lungs and evidence of a cytokine storm – an immune response in which the body starts to attack its own cells and tissues rather than just fighting off the virus. The mice that only received saline remained normal.

The researchers did not, according to this report, indicate whether the finding has any significance for the vaccines and their side effects. The Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines all work by delivering genetic material that induces cells around the body to produce the spike protein, which the immune system then becomes primed to recognise. A question arising from this research is whether, if the spike protein is pathogenic in its own right and not just a means of gaining entry to cells, this explains any of the Covid-like side-effects of the vaccines, including some of the rare serious ones.

Other research has suggested that “the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (without the rest of the viral components) triggers cell signalling events that may promote pulmonary vascular remodelling and pulmonary arterial hypertension as well as possibly other cardiovascular complications”. These matters should continue to be investigated.

Worth reading the Medical Xpress report in full.

(Image: Using a newly developed mouse model, researchers found that exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein alone was enough to induce COVID-19-like symptoms including severe inflammation in the lungs. The left images show healthy mouse lung tissue while the right images show tissue from mouse lungs exposed to the spike protein. Credit: Pavel Solopov, Old Dominion University.)